Recipes

Pesto

Pesto is great.  Its so flexible.  You can add different herbs for different flavours. It’s traditionally made with pine nuts, but they’re pretty expensive, so I substituted toasted walnuts. You can add whatever kind of nuts you like. You can serve it on pasta, meat, chicken or fish. Use it as a base sauce for pizza. Add it to rice to punch up a side dish. Add lots of garlic, or just a little.  It’s all about your preference. Continue reading

Quinoa Salad with Poppy Seed Dressing

I developed this recipe when I was looking for something to serve as a side dish with grilled fish.  I didn’t feel like eating the traditional starches or a basic salad, but wanted something filling and fresh, which is almost a dichotomy.  Unlike most grains, quinoa serves as both a carb and a protein, which make this an ideal dish for vegans and vegetarians, and the combination of the subtle heat of the Dijon mustard and the unexpected bursts of sweet from the grated apples make this salad a party in your mouth.  It was originally served with grilled fish with mango salsa, and it was the perfect accompaniment. It can be served warm or chilled. Continue reading

Cheerios Marshmallow Treats

As a dessert marshmallow treats are incredibly underrated.  I, personally, have always made them with Cheerios, because I feel that rice crispies as a cereal are nutritionally bereft without the milk.  Cheerios, on the other hand, come in a variety of flavours, and make at least a nod to nutrition with some fibre and protein content. (I know I’m totally trying to justify Cheerios here.  I just like them.)  As a summer treat, they can’t be beat because you don’t have to turn on the oven or even the stove to get a spur-of-the-moment sweet snack.

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Spaghetti with Summer Sauce

This is a no-cook pasta sauce that is so quick and easy for those hot summer days.  My Dad made this for us when we were kids.  I have no idea how closely this mirrors what he used to make for us, but it’s how I make it and we all like it.  The longer you allow it to sit and have the flavours mingle the better, but allow a minimum of at least 1 hour.  We will have this with some grilled Italian sausage on the side to get some protein in, but you can easily use chicken too.  Or, if you want to keep it vegan or vegetarian, add some chickpeas to the sauce when you first mix it up to allow them to absorb the garlicky-herby flavours of the ingredients. Continue reading

BBQ Flat Chicken

The best way to get an even cook on a barbecued chicken without a rotisserie is to remove the spine, open it up and flatten it.  I have filmed a video of my husband flattening a chicken so you can see how easy it is, but if you’re at all squeamish, make sure the sound is turned off because you do hear the bones.  It actually sounds louder in the video than it does in real life, though. (Technical difficulties–okay, it’s all User-related–loading the video.  Please bear with me.  It’s coming.)  Opening up the chicken allows you to season and flavour the inside of the chicken as well as the outside and creates a “rack” (ie, the rib cage) for you to cook the chicken on so it doesn’t stick to the grill. You will end up with a juicy, succulent chicken with nice, crispy skin, in just about an hour.  This recipe is the directions for a very basic chicken, but the Tips section below includes flavour variations and how to apply them. Continue reading

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